Music Festival continues<br>

The Newman & Oltman Guitar Duo performs tonight.

The diverse range of live perform-ances kicked off last weekend with a pair of classically-themed concerts by the Calder String Quartet. While festival founder and artistic director Clare Hoffman characterized those programs as the most traditional of nine scheduled performances, familiar pieces by Hayden, Beethoven, and Shostakovich took on a fresh dimension in a live performance that proved that the art of making music can please more than the ears. The Calder Quartet’s precision performances don’t simply happen – they flow out of a complexity of unspoken communication between its members with nuances that would be lost in a larger venue.

The programs also featured 20 works by high school-age Native American composers mentored through the Native American Composer Apprentice Project started by Hoffman four years ago.

“If you’ve been here before, you know you’re in for a treat,” said Hoffman in introducing the works. “If you haven’t been here before…well you’re in for a treat.” And she was right.

There are still seven concerts left and when they’re done, it will be another year before this level of performance is so accessible again. There are also two more opportunities to hear (and watch) the Calder Quartet who will join with the Newman & Oltman Guitar Duo and Pulitzer-prize winning author Frank McCourt for Laments and Dances, from the Irish on Friday and Saturday.

Also to come are the Festival’s popular jazz night on Wednesday, Sept. 22 and two classical concerts to close the Festival.

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