Kaibab employees visit Navajo Nation Forestry Department

Photo: Kaibab National Forest, Southwestern Region, USDA Forest Service<br>
Navajo Nation Forestry Department botanist A. K. Arbab speaks about a 2,200-acre reforestation project atop Defiance Plateau. On the right is Mark Nabel, Tusayan Ranger District forester, and in the middle is Garry Domis, North Kaibab Ranger District silviculturist.

Photo: Kaibab National Forest, Southwestern Region, USDA Forest Service<br> Navajo Nation Forestry Department botanist A. K. Arbab speaks about a 2,200-acre reforestation project atop Defiance Plateau. On the right is Mark Nabel, Tusayan Ranger District forester, and in the middle is Garry Domis, North Kaibab Ranger District silviculturist.

FREDONIA, Ariz. - Employees of the Kaibab National Forest and Navajo Nation Forestry Department met Oct. 18 and 19 in Ft. Defiance, Ariz. to share information, explore common ground and discuss ways of sharing resources in the future.

The meeting was something out of the ordinary for both agencies, but the enthusiasm to build a partnership was mutual.

"In all my time here, we've never had a visit from a national forest," said Navajo Forest Manager Alex Becenti. "So, I am encouraged to hear this talk of building relationships."

The group spent the first day of the trip exchanging information about their respective forests and forestry programs. The second day, the group visited the site of a 2,200-acre forest restoration project atop Defiance Plateau and the site of a proposed timber sale in the Chuska Mountains.

According to Becenti, the Navajo Nation Forestry Department manages about 600,000 acres of ponderosa pine and mixed conifer forest, and about 4.8 million acres of pinyon-juniper woodlands, with only 32 employees. One of the department's recent successes involved supplying firewood to hundreds of local residents during a severe winter storm power outage last year.

The Kaibab National Forest is also a source of firewood for many Navajo residents living on the western side of the reservation. Kaibab employees discussed ways of improving firewood and ceremonial forest product offerings to Navajo residents, as well as an upcoming hand-thinning project along the Navajo

border with the Tusayan Ranger District that was selected for funding by the Coconino Resource Advisory Committee.

The Navajo foresters also indicated a need for a certified silviculturist - or tree specialist - to review the silviculture prescriptions within their National Environmental Policy Act project documents. North Kaibab silviculturist Garry Domis agreed to help the department in any way he could.

The Kaibab employees invited the Navajo foresters to visit the Kaibab forest in the near future and both groups expressed an interest in continuing to build a relationship between the national and tribal forests.

"In the end the Navajo people will benefit as well as the Navajo forest," said Kaibab Navajo Liaison Mae Franklin.

For more information, please contact Public Affairs Specialist Patrick Lair at (928) 643-8172.

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