Coco Fire and Fuller Fire managed on Kaibab Forest

TUSAYAN, Ariz. - The Coco Fire is expected to burn naturally and will continue consuming hazardous fuels, smoldering and producing light visible smoke within the immediate fire area. The fire is estimated at 2,000 acres as of Aug. 1.

The fire organization is transitioning from a Type 3 to a Type 4, reducing in size yet efficient for firefighting conditions. Crews will continue to hold and monitor the fire and mitigate any hazardous trees weakened by the fire.

The Lightning caused wildfire started July 22 and is located six miles southeast of Tusayan, near the junction of Forest Service Roads 302 and 2719.

The Fuller Fire on the North Rim of Grand Canyon continues to burn at a low intensity towards the west, producing minimal smoke.

Meteorologists predict increased moisture and rain which will likely slow the spread of fire. Firefighters are conducting minor ignition operations on the west flank to reintroduce fire into an area that has not received a natural ignition in more than 200 years. The objective for these ignitions is to bring low intensity fire along the ground at a gradual rate of 200 to 300 feet per day. The extended absence of wildfire increases the risk of catastrophic fire in this area, which could have negative impact on vegetation, soil, wildlife, and other natural resources.

The Fuller Fire reduces the likelihood of catastrophic wildfire in the future by restoring the natural fire cycle and improving forest health. The lightning caused fire started June 29 and grew to 14,493 acres.

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