National Park Service announces fee free days for 2017

The North Kaibab National Forest on the North RIm of Grand Canyon National Park is scheduling a number of prescribed burns.

Photo/WGCN

The North Kaibab National Forest on the North RIm of Grand Canyon National Park is scheduling a number of prescribed burns.

WASHINGTON — Combine great scenery and history with great savings and visit a national park for free on one of 10 fee free days in 2017.

The 10 entrance fee-free days for 2017 will be:

January 16: Martin Luther King Jr. Day

February 20: Presidents Day

April 15-16 & April 22-23: National Park Week Weekends

August 25: National Park Service Birthday

September 30: National Public Lands Day

November 11-12: Veterans Day Weekend

“National parks are known for their priceless beauty,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “They are a bargain anytime but on these

ten days in 2017, they really will be priceless. We want everyone to visit their national parks and fee free days provide extra incentive to experience these amazing places.”

During fee free days, all National Park Service sites will waive their entrance fees for all visitors. Usually, 124 of the 413 national parks charge entrance fees that range from $3 to $30. The other 289 sites do not have entrance fees. The entrance fee waiver for the fee-free days does not cover amenity or user fees for things such as camping, boat launches, transportation, or special tours.

To continue the national park adventure beyond these fee free days, the annual $80 America the Beautiful National Parks and Federal Recreation Lands Pass allows unlimited entrance to more than 2,000 federal recreation areas, including all national parks,. There are also free or discounted passes available for senior citizens, current military members, fourth grade students and disabled citizens. 

The National Park System includes more than 84 million acres and is comprised of 413 sites including national parks, national historical parks, national monuments, national recreation areas, national battlefields, and national seashores. There is at least one national park in every state. 

Last year, 307 million people visited a national park. They spent $16.9 billion, which supported 295,000 jobs and had a $32 billion impact on the U.S. economy.

In addition to national parks, the National Park Service works with tribes, local governments, and partners across the country to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Programs such as the National Register of Historic Places, National Heritage Areas, National Wild and Scenic Rivers, and the Rivers, Trails, Conservation Assistance Program revitalize communities, celebrate local heritage, and provide places for people to get outside, be active and have fun.

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