Nov. 7 Tusayan Ballot Breakdown

Registered Tusayan voters must mail their ballots before the Nov. 7 election deadline.

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Registered Tusayan voters must mail their ballots before the Nov. 7 election deadline.

Ballot Breakdown: Prop 400

Should the building height for commercial and high-density residential zones in the town of Tusayan be raised from 35-40 feet to 65 feet?

A yes vote means the building height will be raised to 65 feet.

A no vote means the building height will remain the same.

The current building height for all zones in Tusayan is around 40 feet. Proposition 400 would allow buildings up to 65 feet tall — about five or six stories — to be built in five specific zones, including two multi-family residential, a general commercial, a heavy commercial and a planned community zone (Ten X Ranch and/or Kotzin Ranch).

The tallest structure in Tusayan currently is the National Geographic Visitor Center, which stands 56.5 feet tall.

If the measure passes, new building projects and additions to current structures would be evaluated on a case-by-case basis by the Planning and Zoning Commission and the town planner, and would be subject to reviews of fire safety, infrastructure and resource impacts.

Concerns expressed by local residents, environmental groups and Grand Canyon National Park include negative impacts on night sky-viewing, views from the North and South Rims, potential flight path hazards and increased water usage.

If the measure fails to pass, the current height limits will remain in effect.

Ballot Breakdown: Tusayan Fire District Tax Rate Cap Override

Should the Tusayan Fire District be allowed to increase the tax levy rate from $3.25 to $3.50 for a period of five years?

A yes vote means the current rate of $3.25 will increase to $3.50 per $100 of Limited Property Value assessment.

A no vote means the tax rate levy will remain at $3.25 per $100 of Limited Property Value assessment.

The Tusayan Fire District current operates at a $3.25 tax levy per $100 of Limited Property Value assessment. The Arizona legislature passed a bill allowing the district to pass a one-time override raising that limit to $3.50 for a period of 5 years.

The current override expires Dec. 31, 2017.

If the measure passes, the fire district will be allowed to raise the tax rate levy 25 cents — from $3.25 to $3.50 — for a period of five years. The extra funding goes directly to the fire district for equipment and personnel salaries. The impact on the average property owner would be around $25 per year. The tax rate levy increase is a one-time measure and the rate would return to $3.25 as of Jan. 1, 2023.

If the measure fails to pass, the tax rate levy would remain at $3.25 and there would be no increases for property owners residing in the district.

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