Grand Canyon National Park back to Level 1 water conservation

Residents and visitors are encouraged to continue conserving water

The Trans Canyon Pipeline, built in 1965, has begun deteriorating rapidly in past few years and is in need of complete replacement.

Photo/NPS

The Trans Canyon Pipeline, built in 1965, has begun deteriorating rapidly in past few years and is in need of complete replacement.

GRAND CANYON, Ariz. — After several weeks of pipeline breaks and water restrictions, water in storage tanks on the South Rim of Grand Canyon has reached sustainable levels. Park operations will return to and stay at Level 1 water conservation measures.

In Level 1 water conservation, visitors, residents and businesses should continue to use basic water conservation practices and mindful water use at all times. Restroom sinks water bottling stations have been turned back on, and park businesses can now use the commercial bus wash. Drinking water is available at various South Rim water bottle filling stations and at Indian Garden and Phantom Ranch in the inner canyon.

Some water conservation tips for visitors and residents include turning off the water while brushing teeth or shaving, washing only full loads of dishes or laundry, selectively flushing the toilet and reporting leaks and wasteful water use to appropriate staff. Residents are also reminded to use non-potable water for plants, lawns and washing vehicles and to not fill large-capacity water tanks in the park.

In the event of a future disruption in water delivery, the park will implement mandatory water restriction levels based on the volume of water in storage. Some restrictions may include the use of disposable dishes and utensils in restaurants; closing laundry, showers, and RV dump/fill station at Camper Services and providing hand sanitizer in public restrooms.

The National Park Service would like to thank its partners, staff, residents and visitors for conserving water over the last several weeks and for their continued water conservation efforts.

Information provided by the National Park Service.

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