Parks in Brief: Yellowstone National Park, Pearl Harbor National Memorial

Pearl Harbor National Memorial. (Photo/NPS)

Pearl Harbor National Memorial. (Photo/NPS)

Yellowstone’s first golden eagle fitted with radio transmitter dies of lead poisoning

MAMMOTH HOT SPRINGS, Wyo. — A Golden Eagle was found dead on Dec. 6, 2018, near Phantom Lake in the northern section of Yellowstone National Park.

A recent lab necropsy indicated the cause of death was lead poisoning. Levels found in the golden eagle were extremely high and well over lethal toxicity.

The adult female was the first golden eagle in Yellowstone’s history to be marked with a radio transmitter. The marked raptor was part of a study to understand productivity, movements, survival, and cause of death in Yellowstone.

Transmitter data revealed that the eagle ranged extensively during the 2018 autumn hunting season north of the park before she died. Hunter-provided carrion, especially gut piles, is an important food resource for golden eagles and other avian scavengers. The lead levels in the marked eagle indicated it likely ate carrion that contained lead fragments.

WWII Valor in the Pacific National Monument redesignated Pearl Harbor National Memorial

HONOLULU — NPS recently announced the redesignation of the WWII Valor in the Pacific National Monument to the Pearl Harbor National Memorial. The provision was passed as part of the John D. Dingell Jr. Conservation, Management and Recreation Act, which passed both houses of Congress in February and was signed into law on March 12.

“The park and its partners are universally delighted with the name change that was recently signed into law,” said Superintendent Jacqueline Ashwell. “Our prior name was rather long and unwieldy and difficult to remember. The new name is immediately understandable and is a name commensurate with the importance and reverence of this site.”

Information provided by NPS

Comments

Comments are not posted immediately. Submissions must adhere to our Use of Service Terms of Use agreement. Rambling or nonsensical comments may not be posted. Comment submissions may not exceed a 200 word limit, and in order for us to reasonably manage this feature we may limit excessive comment entries.

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.